Face to face with Sri Ramana Maharishi 3 & 4

இதன் தமிழ் பதிப்பை இங்கே படிக்கவும்.

Prof. Banning Richardson, M.A. (Hons.) (Cantab.), A.B. (Princeton)

Prof. Banning Richardson, M.A. (Hons.) (Cantab.), A.B. (Princeton), came to teach English literature at St. Stephens College, Delhi, in the 1930s. He felt ‘ravished’ by the description of the Maharshi in A Search in Secret India (no. 1).

In the presence of Sri Ramana Maharshi I felt an inward joy, which suffused my consciousness, and made thinking seem superfluous. I had come into touch with spiritualism of the finest type. When I was in the presence of the Master I was so filled with joy and peace that the desire to ask questions disappeared.This happened throughout the
brief three days [In May 1937] I stayed at Sri Ramanasramam. When one comes into the presence of a man who is ‘good’ notcmerely because he shuns ‘evil’ but because his love is universal and falls alike on the just and unjust, then one experiences immediate recognition of a soul that is not great as the world values greatness, but great when
compared to an absolute standard of values – a precious stone, an emerald without flaw. It is a difference not merely of quality, but of kind. What Jesus the Christ taught 2000 years ago that “I am in my Father and my Father is in me. My Father and I are one” is the same as He who teaches today at Tiruvannamalai.

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Justice K. Sundaram Chettiar, B.A., B.L., of Madras High Court

Justice K. Sundaram Chettiar, B.A., B.L., of Madras High Court wrote a foreword to the first well-known biography of Sri Ramana by B.V. Narasimha Swami entitled Self Realization (1931).

The years 1909 and ’10 and the earlier part of 1911, when I was the District Munsif of Tiruvannamalai, I deem it to be auspicious in my life for the only reason that I had the privilege of sitting at the feet of Sri Bhagavan.The more I came in contact with him, the greater was my devotion to him. Sri Bhagavan is a mine of Wisdom. Questions on abstruse
subjects have been answered with clarity and directness, which would not be possible except for a realized soul or jivanmukta. He sees everything in himself and himself in everything. Whatever seems to happen in the world is incapable of affecting his peace, which passeth understanding. He has gone beyond the pair of opposites and looks at events in the light of the Absolute. At no time the Sage has done anything on his own initiative as if he has a particular desire for something, nor he has directed others to do anything in fulfilment of any purpose. He has all the characteristics of a sthitaprajna described in the Gita. His very presence generates an atmosphere of peace which
is felt by devotees visiting him with sincerity and faith. Some of those who approached him with a few questions in their mind found that the answers were given anticipating their questions. Some find their doubts cleared while sitting silently within his aura, without any speech by him

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